DOH Extends Deadline for Fiscal Intermediary Authorization Application to Dec. 15

Notice of Extension.  The New York State Department of Health (DOH) has extended the deadline from November 30 to close of business on December 15, 2017 for currently operating Fiscal Intermediaries under the Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program (CDPAP) to submit their Applications for Fiscal Intermediary Authorization.

Currently operating Fiscal Intermediaries must now submit the Authorization Application by December 15 or cease operations immediately. Those who are not yet a Fiscal Intermediary but wish to become one should also submit their Authorization Application by December 15 in order to be among those first to be reviewed.

FAQs Issued. Also today, the DOH issued FAQs addressing the Authorization Application. These FAQs can be found at:

https://hca-nys.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Consumer-Directed-FI-Authorization-FAQs-11-28-17.pdf 

The FAQs answer questions raised after the Authorization Application was issued, as follows:

  1. You must obtain your FI Authorization from DOH before you request a Medicaid Provider Identification number, and the Medicaid number for your FI must be separate from any LHCSA Medicaid number.
  2. You can submit an Authorization Application that is not totally complete to comply with the December 15 deadline, as long as you exercised due diligence to submit an application that was as complete as possible. This implies that you will be able to supplement your application. However, the thoroughness of your application will set the timeline for its review.
  3. As requested in the October 2017 Medicaid Update, (although not specifically requested in the Authorization Application), you are required to submit your marketing and outreach materials in pdf format, and any videos and audio segments in their original format, if they cannot be altered to pdf.
  4. DOH will use the CDPAP statute’s and regulations’ parameters in reviewing your marketing and outreach materials to determine whether they comply with the roles and responsibilities assigned to FIs and consumers.
  5. If you fail to submit your Authorization Application by December 15, your FI is deemed out of compliance with the CDPAP statute, is not authorized to operate as an FI, and is subject to contract termination protocols of your MCOs. However, the additional sentence, “Until the Department receives the Authorization application, the FI will remain out of compliance,” raises the question of whether a late filing can be cured and what the ramifications of a late filing will be to an FI.
  6. All Board members must sign the written resolution authorizing the application’s submission.
  7. Submit the Survey or other mechanism you intend to use to obtain input from consumers and other interested parties; if not available, indicate what you intend to develop to meet this requirement.

FordHarrison LLP advises and counsels Fiscal Intermediaries under CDPAP and home care agencies on all labor, employment and benefit issues. If you have any questions regarding this Legal Alert or would like our advice about particular facts and circumstances at your agency, please contact the author, Stephen Zweig, szweig@fordharrison.com or (212) 453-5900, or contact any of the other attorneys of the firm’s Homecare Industry Law Group in its New York City office. Also, please visit our blog at homecareemploymentlaw.com for additional developments and information.

Participating in New York’s CDPAP Is Necessary to Maintain Your Caseload

Why Has CDPAP Become So Popular? 

Publicity. Radio, newspaper, and subway ads are driving Medicaid home care clients and home care workers to abandon traditional home care agency programs for the greater flexibility and freedom of choice of New York’s Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program (“CDPAP”). Managed care companies are also on board, offering this as an alternative to traditional home care. The benefits to all are many and the restrictions are few, unlike traditional home care.

Contracts. Managed care companies contract with a “Fiscal Intermediary,” a business entity created solely to provide payroll and benefit administration services under the CDPAP. The Fiscal Intermediary, in turn, contracts with Medicaid recipients, known as “Consumers,” referred by the managed care company. Continue reading

FLSA Conditional Certification Denied in NYS for 5,000 Home Care Workers

Continue reading

Individuals, Families, and Households and those who Jointly Employ Home Care Workers with them are all Liable for Unpaid Overtime

Executive Summary: Claims by home care workers for unpaid overtime have risen steadily since the U.S. Department of Labor, in 2015, eliminated the federal overtime exemptions that allowed agency employers essentially to pay no overtime wage premiums. This has greatly affected agency employers In New York, who are increasingly seeing class action suits being filed against them. It has also affected individuals, families and households in New York who hire home care workers directly, especially when the home care worker is an agency-employer worker who is continued for extra hours in a workweek. Since 2010, the New York Domestic Workers Bill of Rights has required “direct-hire” employers of home care workers to pay overtime at time and one half the worker’s regular rate. When an agency worker is continued for extra hours by an individual, family or household, both can be held liable for unpaid overtime on all hours worked over 40 in a workweek, regardless of who scheduled the hours. Beyond the agency and individual, family, or household, others who have the power, whether or not exercised, to hire, employ, or pay the worker, such as a child or relative who takes care of a client’s affairs or an attorney acting under a power of attorney or as a legal guardian, conservator, or trustee, are also at risk of being held liable. Continue reading

Home Care Professionals Series: Part 1 – NYS Domestic Worker’s Bill of Rights

Executive Summary. As most home care agencies know, the United States Department of Labor (“USDOL”) eliminated the companionship exemption for home care agency workers on October 13, 2015 in its Final Rule on the Application of the FLSA to Domestic Service Workers (“Final Rule”). What they may not have considered, however, is that following the Final Rule, the NYS Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, which originally only applied to home care workers directly employed by individual households, now also applies to agency employed home care workers. For NYC agencies, in particular, coming into compliance with Domestic Workers Bill of Rights requires changes to the benefits they provide to their home care workers.

Paid Leave Requirements

Until October 13, 2015, when the USDOL’s Final Rule went into effect, NYC home care agencies’ paid leave policies were only required to comply with the paid sick day requirements under Earned Sick Time Act (ESTA) (effective April 1, 2014, except for unionized agencies, which were exempted until their collective bargaining agreements expired). Now, NYC home care agencies have to comply with both ESTA and the NYS Domestic Workers Bill of Rights (“DWBR”).

DWBR requires that home care workers of eligible home care agencies be given 3 paid “days of rest” if they have been employed with the agency for at least one year and averaged 30 or more hours of work per week. Part-time workers receive fewer days, depending on their average hours worked.

ESTA separately requires that home care workers of eligible home care agencies be provided up to 40 hours of paid sick leave annually. Fortunately, ESTA has special provisions for workers covered by DWBR that effectively allow agencies to credit the paid time given under DWBR toward ESTA’s 40 hour requirement: under ESTA, home care agencies are only required to provide 2 days of sick leave to full-time home care workers (and, consistent with DWBR provisions, less time for part-time workers).

In sum, a NYC home care agency must offer its home care workers at least 5 days of paid time off (3 days of rest under DWBR and 2 sick days under ESTA) if they (i) are employed for at least one year; (ii) worked 30 or more hours per week, on average, during the previous year; and (iii) work more than 80 hours per calendar year in NYC.

Accrual and Use Requirements of Paid Leave

DWBR, unfortunately, is silent on accrual and use limitations home care agencies may impose. The New York State Department of Labor (“NYSDOL”) has issued FAQs advising agencies that paid days of rest are due to the worker at the beginning of the calendar year. For home care workers who have not yet been employed for a full year by the first day of the calendar year, the agency must transition the employee’s benefits by providing a pro rata share of days of rest on the one-year anniversary of employment and then providing the full allotment on the first day of the next calendar year. According to these FAQs, agencies cannot require that workers use days of rest in periods of less than one day, and any unused earned days of rest must be paid at the end of each year and at separation of employment. The NYSDOL FAQs also indicate that a “day” is to be paid at the worker’s regular rate of pay for the average number of hours in his or her normal workday.

ESTA, apparently trying to harmonize its requirements with those of DWBR, requires that additional sick time under ESTA be “calculated” in the same manner as days of rest under DWBR, but does not answer whether many of its other nuanced requirements will give way to the provisions under DWBR.

Weekly Day of Rest

DWBR also entitles home care workers to a 24-hour (consecutive) period “of rest” each week, which it recommends be coordinated with the worker’s traditional day for religious observance. If the home care worker waives this entitlement and accepts work on that day, he or she must be paid at the worker’s overtime rate for all hours worked on this day, whether or not the worker’s total hours for the week exceed 40.

 What questions does the new application of DWBR raise for NYC home care agencies?

  1. How many hours constitutes a “day” if your home care workers work shifts of varying lengths, including 24-hour shifts?
  2. Do home care agencies have to allow their workers to take sick time in 4-hour increments, when that is not required by DWBR?
  3. May a home care agency implement different notice or scheduling requirements for the use of days of rest under DWBR and sick days under ESTA?
  4. If a home care agency’s collective bargaining agreement has not yet expired, and therefore ESTA does not apply, how should the agency plan to implement current DWBR and future ESTA requirements?
  5. If a home care agency had not yet provided any paid days of rest or sick days to its home care workers for 2015, how much time is the agency required to provide retroactively to its workers for 2015?
  6. May a home care agency choose to rollover workers’ sick days rather than pay out at the end of the year, as allowed under ESTA, but not allowed for days of rest under the DWBR?
  7. If a home care agency is providing extra paid time off in addition to DWBR time, what are “best practices” and how should they be written in a paid time off provision in an employee handbook?

The Bottom Line

ESTA and DWBR combine to create a statutory minimum for paid time off available to home care workers. However, the interplay between the two laws is not yet well-defined and agencies should be careful to implement a paid time off policy that complies with the different requirements of both laws.

FordHarrison advises and counsels home care agencies on all labor, employment and benefit issues. If you have any questions regarding this Legal Alert or would like our advice about particular facts and circumstances at your home care agency, please contact the authors, Stephen Zweig, Roshni Chaudhari, or Andrea Orr (paralegal), members of the firm’s Home Care Industry Group in its New York City office at szweig@fordharrison.com, rchaudhari@fordharrison.com, aorr@fordharrison.com, or (212) 453-5900, or the FordHarrison attorney with whom you usually work.